Victoria Whang | Product Designer
Victoria Whang | Product Designer
bitebeauty.jpg

Bite Beauty

Tablet UI

Tablet UI/UX

Bite Beauty - UX Design

Bite Beauty - UX Design

Tablet app prototype for Toronto based beauty company BITE that allows lipstick customization of color, texture, and scent, similar to the experience in BITE Lip Labs.

 

Research

Research

Bite is a Toronto based company that with a focus on lip products. The rapidly growing beauty company values offering many shades that are made up of natural, wholesome ingredients. The first customer facing store was opened in NYC and the second one in Toronto didn’t open for about two years after that.

We wanted to bring the Lip Lab experience to a tablet user, who may not have a physical storefront in their city, the time to go there for the full treatment, or an appointment availability that aligns with their own schedule. A crucial aspect of the experience is the step-by-step method of selecting shade, texture, and scent and stopping to examine each element before moving on and we wanted to incorporate this idea as three separate screens within the app.

Lessons from Testing

Lessons from Testing

Design Challenge 1: Using the initial paper prototype, users often asked “What now?” and were confused when faced with selecting the texture and scent after finalizing the color of the lip product. At the same time, with a digital prototype where we changed the layout to be a single screen where the user can customize all three aspects in one control panel, the blender interface was still a bit challenging to navigate.

Design Challenge 2: Even with the three sectional headings, the user's eyes require time to adjust and travel through the entire screen carefully before understanding they need to engage with anything more than just the color wheel. Often, our test subjects only played with the color wheel and did not register the other two sections before proceeding to the purchase screen. If the other two sections were pre-filled however, that would cause problems down the line if the user neglected to change the default presets and end up receiving an order that not to their texture and scent liking.

Future Considerations: In further iterations, it would be beneficial to test designs that clearly differentiate the three steps with definite divisions between them. There may also need to be a way to prevent the user from purchasing the customized product if they did not engage with the texture and scent fields, in order to make sure that they are buying something they will surely enjoy.

Commercial storyboard and cinematography by ME
Shot and edited by Jerome Cheng